Meet Me Around the Corner – Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection

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The exhibition features artists like Lizzi Bougatsos, Corin Hewitt, Terence Koh and Klara Lidén, who express themselves through diverse media such as sculpture, drawing, video, painting and photography. These artists often take their point of departure in existing visual material, yet in addition to appropriating pictures from mass media and consumer society, they personally transform their materials and means. Through collages, assemblages and altered readymades, the artists create stories. The impulse behind a work may be something surreal and surprising, like the works of Matthew Ronay or mysterious and immaterial, as we see in Trisha Donnelly’s works. In addition, we find works of artists like Gardar Eide Einarsson and Karl Haendel, expressing strong political engagement. The artists work with impressions from contemporary culture such as cartoon series and graffiti, yet when doing so, also engage with art historical traditions such as Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neorealism, Pop Art or 1960s Performance Art. The artworks do not represent any particular generation, but can be seen as narrative, object based and figurative.

The exhibition title Meet Me Around the Corner is borrowed from Dan Colen’s eponymously titled painting. The letters are painted with big and abrupt movements reminiscent of spontaneous, anonymous messages in the urban landscape. With this title, we invite visitors to engage in dialogue with the artworks, and hope the exhibition will open up for enlightening and stimulating experiences. Discussions of several works are recorded on sound files that are available via mobile telephone.

Artists: Matthew Barney, Frank Benson, Mike Bouchet, Lizzi Bougatsos, Paul Chan, Dan Colen, Trisha Donnelly, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Hannah Greely, Taft Green, Karl Haendel, Corin Hewitt, Damien Hirst, Christian Holstad, Matt Johnson, Mike Kelley, Terence Koh, Jeff Koons, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, Klara Lidén, Nate Lowman, Jason Meadows, Bruce Nauman, Cady Noland, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Adam Putnam, Charles Ray, Jason Rhoades, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, Matthew Ronay, Tom Sachs, Cindy Sherman, Josh Smith Christopher Wool.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran, Hanne Beate Ueland, Grete Årbu.

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Rotating Views #1 – Astrup Fearnley Collection

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Rather, it can best be described as a carefully selected cluster of major works by leading international contemporary artists.

The Astrup Fearnley Collection is vast and expanding. For the next two years, its works will go on a temporary rotating display within the museum. The concept of rotation enables us to work with the collection as a whole but not at the same time. It presents a way to create constellations of works ‘on the move’, and facilitates surprising and unique assemblages of art across a large, diverse conceptual and thematic spectrum.

Rotating the works introduces the notion of a broken linearity, as works from several decades and different political and cultural contexts are shown together. It also allows for an atypical geographical order as ‘Western’ artists from Scandinavia, France, Germany, Britain and the United States share the space with ‘Eastern’ artists from China, Japan, Korea, Thailand and India. Rotation, in this way, highlights the ‘alphabetical’, artist-based nature of the Astrup Fearnley Collection, emphasising individual artists rather than an abstract chronological or historical framework.

Rotation allows for a multitude of possibilities and as such mirrors the complex, open nature of pictorial language. Inviting endless ways of bringing together different kinds of art, it generates new readings and experiences of particular objects and creates ‘inter-work’ relationships, which may even reveal hidden and mysterious coalitions and affiliations.

Over the next two years, visitors are offered a chance to see works from the collection in a new light. This long-term engagement presents a potpourri of artists, stylistic genres and complex social, political and aesthetic themes. And in the process, it documents pioneering new dimensions in contemporary art.

Artists included in the exhibition are: Allora & Calzadilla, Matthew Barney, Frank Benson, Cao Fei, Paul Chan, Chu Yun, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Olafur Eliasson, Gilbert & George, Douglas Gordon, Shilpa Gupta, Guyton Walker, Damien Hirst, Anselm Kiefer, Ann Lislegaard, Liu Wei, Bjarne Melgaard, Shintaro Miyake, Adam Putnam og Yang Fudong.

Program Rotating Views #1 – 17.01-22.03.08

Sunday 18 January from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance
Clamor (2006) examines music and sound as possible weapons, and the role of music in war and political conflicts throughout the world. 5 musicians play fragments from an extensive archive of military music from within the bunker.

Sunday 25 January from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance

Saturday 24 January from 12.30 pm:
The children’s art club Rasmus invites children aged 5-10 to experience art in the museum one Saturday each month. See separate programme. In Norwegian.

Thursday 5 February 6 pm:
Frank Benson: Artist Talk
The Astrup Fearnley Collection holds several works by American artist Frank Benson. Included in Rotations #1 is the new acquisition Chocolate Fountain #2 (2008).

Saturday 8 February from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance

Thursday 19 February 8 pm:
Ingrid Pettersen: ’Matthew Barneys Torii’
Ingrid Pettersen holds a Masters Degree on Barneys art and will discuss the work Torii with reference to his earlier production. Pettersen works as a museum host in the Astrup Fearnley Museum. In Norwegian.

Sunday 22 January from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance

Thursdag 26 February 6 pm:
Grete Årbu: ’Astrup Fearnley Collection’
Grete Årbu, curator at the Astrup Fearnley Museum, will give an insight to the exceptional collection administered by the museum. In Norwegian.

Saturday 28 February from 12.30 pm:
The children’s art club Rasmus invites children aged 5-10 to experience art in the museum one Saturday each month. See separate programme. In Norwegian.

Thursday 5 March 6 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla: Artist Talk
The American artists Allora & Calzadilla’s (live and work in Puerto Rico) are presented in Rotation Views #1 with the installation Clamor (2006). The artists were also included in Uncertain States of America with the film Under Discussion (2005).

Sunday 8 March from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance

Thursday 19 March 6 pm:
Susanne Ø. Sæther: ’Douglas Gordons noir-univers’
Susanne Ø. Sæther holds a PhD on sampling in video art where she amongst two other artworks analyzed Douglas Gordon’s through a looking glass. In Norwegian.

Sunday 22 March from 2 pm:
Allora & Calzadilla, Clamor: Live music performance

Saturday 21 February from 12.30 pm:
The children’s art club Rasmus invites children aged 5-10 to experience art in the museum one Saturday each month. See separate programme. In Norwegian.

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R.B. Kitaj – Diaspora

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Kitaj was American, but lived almost 40 years in England. His art developed in the London art scene beginning in the 1960s, when a dynamic generation of young artists took painting into a new direction by exploring impulses from both the figurative tradition and popular culture. Their vision sparked off the considerable international interest in painting that flourished in the 1970s and 80s. Kitaj has been associated with the ‘School of London’ generation, a label that never referred to a specific group or style, but was used in connection with a number of painters preoccupied with the figurative aspect of painting at a time when abstract art had dominated the art scene for a long time. Kitaj was one of the most prominent figures in the British art scene and also had a major impact on the development of British pop art. This was the context in which Kitaj developed as an artist, and although his art may be associated with the trends in figurative painting and British pop art, the most important influence on his art was a sense of not belonging, Diaspora, spawning an oeuvre in which symbols and references of visual, literary, historic and personal origin are brought together into colourful, narrative and complex compositions.

Kitaj has an important presence in the Astrup Fearnley Collection, which contains some of his most outstanding works. In this exhibition we present a selection of these works, together with works from other Norwegian collections, in an exhibition that reviews Kitaj’s contribution as a historical artist, but also as one whose works still resonate with those of younger generations of artists.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran and Therese Möllenhoff

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Rotating Views #2

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Bjarne Melgaard’s expressive paintings, drawings, sculptures and installations have already achieved a unique position within Norwegian and International art history. His characteristic style and often provocative themes have made him a controversial, but also highly regarded artist, whose works are well represented in the Astrup Fearnley Collection. For this comprehensive exhibition we have gathered several of the most important works from the last fifteen years to emphasize the different periods in Melgaard’s art. We are also pleased to include several new paintings.

Melgaard’s art is brimming with literary and art historical references, and he is often inspired by films and music. During the exhibition we have invited Melgaard to curate a film programme for Cinemateket, Filmens Hus. The film programme will open Friday 22 January at 7pm with a conversation between Bjarne Melgaard and Kjell Runar Jenssen.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran, Hanne Beate Ueland, Grete Årbu

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To Be With Art Is All We Ask

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Together, they present a cosmopolitan urban vision that spans different cultures and historical periods, dealing with themes like politics and the economy, religion and power structures, violence and sexuality, identity and memory, objectivity and subjectivity, fiction, beauty and art, all of which make up the common contemporary experience.

The sail-form roof that characterizes the new building conditions the shape of the display rooms, creating a sequence of spaces of various sizes and heights that challenge the works of art and influence the layout of the exhibition. Walking through the show the visitor will be aware of a continuous interference between the art objects or installations and the architecture, emphasizing their flowing multi-semantic nature. The exhibition has a chronological layout, a mise-en-scene that not only contextualizes the works, but allows the spectator to compare and evaluate the differences and similarities between what each of the artists was doing at the same moment in time. It also confirms a phenomenon that was not present in other historical periods and is unique to the art of our time: despite the fact that the world continues to be made up of diverse cultural zones, international contemporary art has a universal language.

This common aesthetic tends to be highly narrative, and draws on postmodern devices such as the use of the readymade and strategies of appropriation. Within this preoccupation with the copy, the metaphor of death is never far away, at least in reference to the late twentieth-century theory of the “death of the author,” which in more recent times has become nuanced by the notion that the ready-made and the copy are “original” art works after all. Analyzing the different conceptual approaches and degrees of appropriation adopted by the artists here, such as Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Huang Young Ping, Félix González-Torres, Nate Lowman and Shilpa Gupta, one becomes highly aware of the flexibility and adaptability of the current notion of art.

Curator: Gunnar B. Kvaran

Assistant curator: Therese Kjelsberg Möllenhoff

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Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection

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From the beginning of the 1960s and until today, the Astrup Fearnley Collection has had a continuing development and growth. The collection reflects the diversity that has dominated art for the past decades. Many of the works have a strong narrative character, where the artists are questioning our reality through visual commentaries in an available and spectacular way – often with serious socially critical undertones. Up to the 1990s, the selection of artists primarily came from Europe and USA, like Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, Richard Prince and Damien Hirst. During the last decade however, the collection has concentrated on younger American contemporary artists like Paul Chan, Nate Lowman, Dan Colen, Frank Benson and Trisha Donnelly. Today, the most innovative artists also come from China, India and Brazil as from New York or London. The collection has for the past years focused on important European, Brazilian, Japanese, Chinese and Indian contemporary artists.

The works on display in the permanent collection are frequently changing. In this new version in spring 2015, the museum presents many exciting, newly acquired works by young contemporary artists who have already received recognition on the international art scene. Amongst these are British Helen Marten (b. 1985), Swiss Pamela Rosenkrantz (b. 1979), New Zealander Simon Denny (b. 1982) and the American artists Ryan Trecartin (b. 1981), Jordan Wolfson (b. 1980), Alex Israel (b. 1982) and Ian Cheng (b. 1984). In addition, we present works by important Norwegian artists like Mari Slaattelid, Bjarne Melgaard, Ida Ekblad, Matias Faldbakken and Gardar Eide Einarsson This illustrates the collection’s focus on the younger generation on the international contemporary art scene. Newly acquired and not before exhibited works by established and significant American artists like Julie Mehretu, Glenn Ligon, Rachel Harrison and Mark Bradford are also included in the exhibition.

The museum’s permanent collection of Damian Hirst’s iconic formaldehyde-works are in this exhibition contextualised with other British artists of the same generation, who in the 1990s were known as the YBAs: Young British Artists. Opposite Hirst we are showing works by the artists Tracey Emin, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Marc Quinn, Gary Hume and Rachel Whiteread. In the Kiefer Hall on the first floor, we are presenting another earlier perspective of the collection, the European – especially British and German painting. Anselm Kiefer’s monumental work is contextualised through other German painters like Martin Kippenberger and Sigmar Polke. In a separate room, we present a selection of the museum’s collection of European pop artists such as David Hockney, Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Eduardo Arroyo and Öivind Fahlström.

The works we now present illustrates important lines and tendencies in the Astrup Fearnley Collection’s history – from the 1960s British and European pop painting and German Neo-expressionism via the British YBA-artists and the American appropriation artists in the 1980s and 1990s and to the past decades focus on the younger generation of international contemporary artists.

Artists:
Eduardo Arroyo, Tauba Auerbach, Frank Benson, Peter Blake, Ross Bleckner, Lizzi Bougatsos, Mark Bradford, Patrick Caulfield, Paul Chan, Ian Cheng, Dan Colen, Simon Denny, Trisha Donnelly, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Ida Ekblad, Tracey Emin, Öyvind Fahlström, Matias Faldbakken, Robert Gober, Andreas Gursky, Karl Haendel, Rachel Harrison, Damien Hirst, David Hockney, Gary Hume, Alex Israel, Matthew Day Jackson, Rashid Johnson, Anselm Kiefer, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Glenn Ligon, Nate Lowman, Helen Marten, Julie Mehretu, Bjarne Melgaard, Bruce Nauman, Odd Nerdrum, Cady Noland, Raymond Pettibon, Sigmar Polke, Seth Price, Richard Prince, Adam Putnam, Marc Quinn, Charles Ray, Paul Rebeyrolle, Germaine Richier, Torbjørn Rødland, Pamela Rosenkranz, Tom Sachs, Cindy Sherman, Gedi Sibony, Mari Slaattelid, Josh Smith, Thomas Struth, Takashi Murakami, Sam Taylor-Johnson, Ryan Trecartin, Piotr Uklanski, Andro Wekua, Rachel Whiteread, Jordan Wolfson, Christopher Wool, Aaron Young.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran and Therese Möllenhoff.

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Bjarne Melgaard – Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection

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Bjarne Melgaard has already achieved a unique position in Norwegian and international art with his expressive paintings, drawings and sculptures. Melgaard’s distinctive style and provocative themes have made ​​him a controversial yet highly respected artist. The exhibition shows works from the past 19 years and represents all periods of Melgaard’s oeuvre.

Astrup Fearnley Museet rotates on a regular basis the works on display from the collection. With this solo exhibition in the collection, we initiate an a new exhibition series in which we’ll present and highlight some of the most important artists in the collection. These exhibitions will be shown in Building 2: The Collection, and will have a duration of three months. Members of the Art Club are invited to the exhibition openings which are always held the evening before the exhibition opens to the public.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran and Therese Möllenhoff

The next exhibition in the collection will be an exhibition with works by R.B. Kitaj, opening February 28th.

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Jens Johannessen – Collage / Décollage

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Johannessen has an important presence in the Astrup Fearnley collection which contains of some of his most outstanding work.

The exhibition focuses on Johannessen’s use of collage techniques and decollage. The main focus is on the “cut images” that Johannessen developed from the 60s and onwards, the works he developed in the 60s and 70s with iron stencils and in the 90s with paper stencils. Together, this shows how Johannessen developed both the collage technique and the picturesque medium by using and integrate already existing motives in the painting.

Curated by Gunnar B. Kvaran and Therese Möllenhoff

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The World is Made of Stories

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Nobody can see, perceive or apprehend the whole world on their own. We all learn about the world through others, through different kinds of stories told by the media or by individuals. The exhibition The World is Made of Stories is a constellation of narrative works that tell private and public stories. Together, they make up a multi-layered narrative referring to different times and geographical places. It is a story about art history, urbanism, politics, memory, sexuality and violence, religion and aesthetics, to name just a few of the themes that the artists have addressed in their works using a variety of materials, techniques and narrative structures. The World is Made of Storiesoffers a polyphony of voices, objects and images, which enlighten while also raising important questions.

The exhibition is dynamically organised and will continuously be in development. Artwork are changed and new ones will be presented. The stories that are told will change and one will through that experience the diversity of the Astrup Fearnley Collection.

Artists:
Eduardo Arroyo, Francis Bacon, Frank Benson, Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Dan Colen, Miodrag Djuric Dado, Olivier Debré, Trisha Donnelly, Ida Ekblad, Olafur Eliasson, Erró, Ivan Galuzin, Gilbert and George, Robert Gober, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Karl Haendel, Johanne Hestvold, Damien Hirst, David Hockney, Rashid Johnson, Asger Jorn, Anselm Kiefer, Martin Kippenberger, R.B. Kitaj, Jeff Koons, Henrik Olai Kaarstein, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, Glenn Ligon, Helen Marten, Bjarne Melgaard, Thiago Martins de Melo, Malcolm Morley, Odd Nerdrum, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, Paul Rebeyrolle, Germaine Richier, Tom Sachs, Prem Sahib, Cindy Sherman, Jordan Wolfson, Christopher Wool.

Curators: Gunnar B. Kvaran og Therese Möllenhoff

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Good Morning America

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The exhibition Good Morning America casts light on how, in the late 1970s and the 1980s, an important group of American artists invented a new form of artistic language, often referred to as ‘Appropriation art’, by borrowing existing photographs, objects, aesthetics, ideas and clichés found in American art and consumer culture.

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